NEW ARCHIVE IMAGE SPECIAL! Our gargoyle image, created in 1997, was never officially published.but...

NEW ARCHIVE IMAGE SPECIAL! Our gargoyle image, created in 1997, was never officially published.but has been much requested by collectors. Based on a gargoyle from Notre Dame, the button is based on the labyrinth in the Chartres Cathedral. Available in Saddle or custom colors on large journals & large notebook covers.

To view details click http://www.oberondesign.com/collections/archive-specials-limited-editions

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The medieval architectural tradition of cathedral gargoyles had both a pratical and spiritual purpose. Their practical use as waterspouts, used to drain rainwater away from vulnerable walls and timbers, is rooted in history. The Egyptians, Greeks, Etruscans and Romans employed artful gutters and spouts, mostly depicting animals and plants, in the same architectural fashion.

In 12th century Europe, gargoyles, or grotesques, combined human features with animals such as snakes, eagles, lions and monkeys. Some extended far from walls for the purpose of rainwater protection, other chimeras or gargoyles were created as fantastical guardians whose powerful spiritual potency protected church ground and worshipers from evil. Medieval populations were largely illiterate so bold visual statements were used to convey large scale concepts such as safety from spiritual chaos.

Our archive special combines one of the most famous gargoyles from Notre Dame with a button fashioned after the labyrinth on the floor of the Chartres Cathedral in France. 


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